Justin Perez
Justin Perez
Lecturer in the Council of the Humanities and Anthropology / Fund For Reunion-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in LGBT Studies

Justin Perez is a cultural anthropologist who studies sexual rights and global health in Latin America through queer and political anthropological approaches. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California-Irvine and his B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Notre Dame.For his dissertation, he conducted over fifteen months of ethnographic fieldwork among gay and transgender communities in the Upper Amazonian region of Peru, examining the effects of rights-based HIV/AIDS initiatives and the social afterlife of these initiatives after they were defunded. He is currently developing a book manuscript based on this research that examines the novel political spaces emerging at the intersections of HIV/AIDS interventions and LGBT rights movements. Specifically, he is interested in how gay and transgender Peruvians reconfigure globalized notions of risk, discrimination, and rights. His research has been supported by the Social Science Research Council, the National Science Foundation, and the Inter-American Foundation. At Princeton, he holds the Fund for Reunion-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellowship in LGBT Studies. He is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology and the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies. During the 2017-2018 academic year he will teach “Introduction to Global LGBTQ Studies” and “Queer Ethnography.”

Biography

Justin Perez is a cultural anthropologist who studies sexual rights and global health in Latin America through queer and political anthropological approaches. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California-Irvine and his B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Notre Dame.For his dissertation, he conducted over fifteen months of ethnographic fieldwork among gay and transgender communities in the Upper Amazonian region of Peru, examining the effects of rights-based HIV/AIDS initiatives and the social afterlife of these initiatives after they were defunded. He is currently developing a book manuscript based on this research that examines the novel political spaces emerging at the intersections of HIV/AIDS interventions and LGBT rights movements. Specifically, he is interested in how gay and transgender Peruvians reconfigure globalized notions of risk, discrimination, and rights. His research has been supported by the Social Science Research Council, the National Science Foundation, and the Inter-American Foundation. At Princeton, he holds the Fund for Reunion-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellowship in LGBT Studies. He is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology and the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies. During the 2017-2018 academic year he will teach “Introduction to Global LGBTQ Studies” and “Queer Ethnography.”