Upcoming Events
(Open to the Public)



September 26, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

Leslie Reagan "Disease, Death, and Memorials: the Agent Orange Quilt of Tears and the AIDS Memorial Quilt"
102 Jones Hall

Public monuments and memorials have increased since the late twentieth century. Most remember those lost as a result of war - whether as soldiers or as victims of genocide, atrocities, or terror - and most are built of marble or stone and intended to be permanent markers on the landscape. Two are mobile and focus on disease and death rather than war. The Agent Orange Quilt of Tears, a memorial for American veterans of the Vietnam War whose health was harmed by exposure ot Agent Orange was first sewn and displayed on the National Mall in front of the Vietnam War Memorial Wall by Jennie Lefevre, the widow of a veteran who died of cancer. The Quilt soon expanded and now includes hundreds of names. Professor Reagan investigates the messages embedded within the Quilt of Tears and the purposes it serves while comparing it to the well-known AIDS Quilt.
 
This workshop grows out of Leslie J. Reagan's current research on, "Seeing Agent Orange in the United States and Vietnam." She is the author of the award-winning Dangerous Pregnancies: Mothers, Abortion, and Disabilities in Modern America; When Abortion Was a Crime; and co-editor of Medicine's Moving Pictures.
 
Leslie J. Reagan is Professor of History at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
 
Lunch provided.
Please call 258-4710 or email cwkessel@princeton.edu by September 22 for reservations.
Co-sponsored with the Program in American Studies.
 

September 27, 2016 -
4:30pm to 6:00pm

GSS Graduate Working Group: Welcome Reception
113 Dickinson Hall - GSS Lounge

Please join the GSS Graduate Working Group to ring in the start of the new academic year with new and returning students. Short remarks will introduce the reading group; we will discuss readings for the semester and potential guest speakers and presenters. Then, all are invited to mingle over light refreshments. 

September 29, 2016 (All day) to October 1, 2016 (All day)

Synesthesia of Law
Various locations, see website for detailed information

What is the role of law in structuring, orienting and perpetuating the multiplicity of conflicts that shape our public and private life? What function does law play in structuring and orienting the ethical dimensions of the multiplicity of conflicts that shape our public and private life? How, if at all, might law serve to relieve and mitigate them? These are the overarching questions addressed by this new collaboration between Princeton University and Sciences Po Law School.
As the first of what we hope will be a series of annual gatherings to be held alternately in Princeton and Paris, this event will draw upon recent innovative work by scholars from various academic fields, and will be organized around a self-consciously provocative reconceptualization of law as a multi-sensual, perceptual process or experience of sense-making.
Considered from this perspective, law is conceived not as a textual product of a reasoned “black-letter” decision, a ‘pure’ system of abstract norms, or an ‘unaffected’ institution of justice, but as a material and sensorial phenomenon or process that speaks, touches, sees, smells and tastes, and is simultaneously heard, seen, felt, tasted and smelled.
For complete information, please go to http://synesthesia.princeton.edu/conference/ 

 

October 4, 2016 -
3:00pm to 4:20pm

A Conversation with Debra Martin Chase
Room 219 at 185 Nassau Street

Film and television producer visits the fall course "Isn't It Romantic: The Broadway Musical from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Sondheim"

October 11, 2016 -
3:00pm to 4:20pm

Guest lecture by Elizabeth L. Wollman, "Broadway and the Generation Gap in the 1960s"
Room 219 - 185 Nassau Street

Musical scholar and author of The Theater Will Rock: A History of the Rock Musical from Hair to Hedwig visits the fall course "Isn't It Romantic: The Broadway Musical from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Sondheim."

October 17, 2016 -
6:00pm to 8:30pm

LGBT Multigenerational Panel
Carl Fields Center Multipurpose Room

More Information Coming Soon

October 19, 2016 -
4:30pm to 6:00pm

Disability Studies Working Group, Work-in-Progress Presentation
127 East Pyne

Professor Cornelia Dayton (University of Connecticut), "Journalizing the State of My Deranged Mind": A Young Apothecary Seeks Treatment in 1810.
For questions contact Andrew Walker-Cornetta aw13@princeton.edu.

October 20, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

GSS Book Club - "Sisters in Law" by Linda Hirshman
113 Dickinson Hall

The author of the celebrated Victory tells the fascinating story of the intertwined lives of Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the first and second women to serve as Supreme Court justices.
 
The relationship between Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg—Republican and Democrat, Christian and Jew, western rancher’s daughter and Brooklyn girl—transcends party, religion, region, and culture. Strengthened by each other’s presence, these groundbreaking judges, the first and second to serve on the highest court in the land, have transformed the Constitution and America itself, making it a more equal place for all women.
 
Linda Hirshman’s dual biography includes revealing stories of how these trailblazers fought for their own recognition in a male-dominated profession—battles that would ultimately benefit every American woman. She also makes clear how these two justices have shaped the legal framework of modern feminism, including employment discrimination, abortion, affirmative action, sexual harassment, and many other issues crucial to women’s lives.
 
Sisters-in-Law combines legal detail with warm personal anecdotes that bring these very different women into focus as never before. Meticulously researched and compellingly told, it is an authoritative account of our changing law and culture, and a moving story of a remarkable friendship.
 
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. PLEASE RSVP TO voelcker@princeton.edu
 

October 25, 2016 (All day)
"The MisCast Masterclass" wth Lorraine Goodman '83
Room 219 at 185 Nassau Street

A workshop on performing musicals across gender

October 25, 2016 -
1:30pm to 2:50pm

A Conversation with Rema Webb
Room 219 at 185 Nassau Street

Webb is a veteran actor currently featured on Broadway in The Color Purple

October 25, 2016 -
6:30pm to 8:00pm

NYC Premiere of "MAJOR"
Tishman Auditorium, The New School , 63 5th Avenue (at 14th Street), New York, NY

“MAJOR!” follows the life and campaigns of Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, a 73-year-old Black transgender woman, a veteran of the 1969 Stonewall Rebellion and organizer who has been fighting for the liberation of trans women of color for over 40 years. Miss Major’s personal story and activism for transgender civil rights, from mobile outreach and AIDS prevention to fighting the prison industrial complex, intersects LGBT struggles for justice and equality from the 1960s to today. The screening will include a Q&A with Miss Major and the filmmakers, Annalise Ophelian and StormMiguel Flores. For more information about the film, please visit http://missmajorfilm.com.
This event will also feature the premiere of “The Personal Stuff,” a short animation about Miss Major, directed by Reina Gossett with art by Micah Bazant and animation by Pamela Chavez.
This event is free and open to the public.
BARNARD COLLEGE HAS OFFERED TO HOLD 10 SEATS FOR PRINCETON ATTENDEES. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED PLEASE CONTACT voelcker@princeton.edu TO RESERVE A SEAT.
 
For more information go to http://missmajorfilm.com 
 
Co-Sponsors: The Office of Social Justice Initiatives at The New School, Columbia University Center for Gender and Sexuality Law, Barnard College Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at NYU, Princeton University Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies & the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies at Barnard College

October 26, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

GSS Workshop: Catherine Clune-Taylor
230 Dickinson Hall

“Securing Cisgendered Lives: A Critique of the Pathologization of Gender Variance in Children”
 
Lunch will be provided. Please call 258‐1835 or email voelcker@princeton.edu for reservations. If provided, copies of the papers can be requested by email one week before the workshop.

November 1, 2016 (All day)
The Prison and the Academy Conference
Location to be announced

Actual date, time and location will be posted soon, as well as a schedule of the conference.
 
A biannual conference organized by graduate student members of the Princeton Prison Teaching Initiative (PTI), this conference hopes to sustain a critical, public conversation about the relationship between universities and the prison system. This event will examine the link between education and prison reform and abolition movements. Our past events have been truly interdisciplinary, drawing on perspectives and methodologies from politics, sociology, gender and sexuality studies, education, anthropology, law, critical race studies, and beyond. Our list of invited speakers for fall 2016 reflects this interdisciplinary framework and includes:
 
Allegra McLeod – Professor of Law and Political Theory at Georgetown University and 2016-2017 Scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study
 
Erica Meiners – Professor of Education and Women’s and Gender Studies at Northeastern Illinois University
 
Dylan Rodriguez – Professor and Chair of Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside and founding member of Critical Resistance: Beyond the Prison Industrial Complex, a national organization for prison abolition, and the Critical Ethnic Studies Association
 
More information coming soon!

November 15, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

GSS Workshop: Serena Mayeri
210 Dickinson Hall

(University of Pennsylvania), “’The Army’s Business is Martial, Not Maternal’: Unwed Mothers, Single Parents, and the Military Welfare State”
Co-sponsored by the Program in Law and Public Affairs.
 
Lunch will be provided. Please call 258‐1835 or email voelcker@princeton.edu for reservations. If provided, copies of the papers can be requested by email one week before the workshop.

November 15, 2016 -
1:30pm to 2:50pm

Master Class with Paul Bogaev
Room 219 at 185 Nassau Street

Grammy and Emmmy Award-winning musical director, arranger, conductor, composer Paul Bogaev gives a master class for Princeton students

November 17, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

GSS Book Club - "A Tale for the Time Being" by Ruth Ozeki
113 Dickinson Hall

In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace — and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine.
 
Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox —possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future.
 
Full of Ozeki’s signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.
 
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. PLEASE RSVP TO voelcker@princeton.edu.

November 21, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

In Conversation: Susan Brison and Anne Hallwod on Brison's Aftermath
301 Marx Hall

More Information Coming Soon

November 30, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

GSS Workshop: Laurel Mei-Singh
207 Dickinson Hall

“We Are Satisfied with the Rocks: Indigeneity and the Theft of Land and Life at Mākua, Hawai'i”
 Co-sponsored by the Program in American Studies.
 
Lunch will be provided. Please call 258‐1835 or email voelcker@princeton.edu for reservations. If provided, copies of the papers can be requested by email one week before the workshop.

December 6, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

GSS Workshop: Heather Love
230 Dickinson Hall

(University of Pennsylvania), “Waving/Drowning: Making Contact with the Queer Past” 
Co-sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in the Humanities.
 
Lunch will be provided. Please call 258‐1835 or email voelcker@princeton.edu for reservations. If provided, copies of the papers can be requested by email one week before the workshop.

December 15, 2016 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

GSS Book Club - "Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman" by Lindy West
113 Dickinson Hall

New York Times Bestseller.
 
Shrill is an uproarious memoir, a feminist rallying cry in a world that thinks gender politics are tedious and that women, especially feminists, can't be funny.

Coming of age in a culture that demands women be as small, quiet, and compliant as possible--like a porcelain dove that will also have sex with you--writer and humorist Lindy West quickly discovered that she was anything but. 

From a painfully shy childhood in which she tried, unsuccessfully, to hide her big body and even bigger opinions; to her public war with stand-up comedians over rape jokes; to her struggle to convince herself, and then the world, that fat people have value; to her accidental activism and never-ending battle royale with Internet trolls, Lindy narrates her life with a blend of humor and pathos that manages to make a trip to the abortion clinic funny and wring tears out of a story about diarrhea.

With inimitable good humor, vulnerability, and boundless charm, Lindy boldly shares how to survive in a world where not all stories are created equal and not all bodies are treated with equal respect, and how to weather hatred, loneliness, harassment, and loss, and walk away laughing. Shrill provocatively dissects what it means to become self-aware the hard way, to go from wanting to be silent and invisible to earning a living defending the silenced in all caps.
 
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. PLEASE RSVP TO voelcker@princeton.edu.

December 31, 2016 (All day)
2016 Interdisciplinary Ethnography Workshop
Date and location to be determined
January 26, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

GSS Book Club - "No Baggage: A Minimalist Tale of Love and Wandering" by Clara Bensen
113 Dickinson Hall

No Baggage is a memoir that will resonate with adventurers and homebodies alike - it's at once a romance, a travelogue, and a bright, modern take on the age-old questions: How do you find the courage to explore beyond your comfort zone? Can you love someone without the need for commitment or any expectations for the future?
 
When Clara Bensen arranges to meet Jeff Wilson on the steps of the Texas State Capitol after just a few email exchanges on OKCupid, it feels like something big is going to happen. Clara, a sensitive and reclusive personality, is immediately drawn to Jeff's freewheeling, push-the-envelope nature. Within a few days of knowing one another, they embark on a 21-day travel adventure from Istanbul to London - with zero luggage, zero reservations, and zero plans. They want to test a simple question: What happens when you welcome the unknown instead of attempting to control it?
 
Donning a single green dress and a small purse with her toothbrush and credit card, Clara travels through eight countries in three weeks. Along the way Clara ruminates on the challenges of traveling unencumbered while realizing when it comes to falling in love, you can never really leave your baggage behind.
 
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. PLEASE RSVP TO voelcker@princeton.edu.

February 15, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

GSS Workshop: Robert Orsi
230 Dickinson Hall

(Northwestern University), “Survivors of Clergy Sex Abuse at Ground Zero of the Secular”
 
Lunch will be provided. Please call 258‐1835 or email voelcker@princeton.edu for reservations. If provided, copies of the papers can be requested by email one week before the workshop.

February 23, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

GSS Book Club - "Miller's Valley: A Novel" by Anna Quindlen
113 Dickinson Hall

New York Times Bestseller.
 
In a small town on the verge of big change, a young woman unearths deep secrets about her family and unexpected truths about herself. Filled with insights that are the hallmark of Anna Quindlen’s bestsellers, Miller’s Valley is an emotionally powerful story about a family you will never forget.
 
For generations the Millers have lived in Miller’s Valley. Mimi Miller tells about her life with intimacy and honesty. As Mimi eavesdrops on her parents and quietly observes the people around her, she discovers more and more about the toxicity of family secrets, the dangers of gossip, the flaws of marriage, the inequalities of friendship and the risks of passion, loyalty, and love. Home, as Mimi begins to realize, can be “a place where it’s just as easy to feel lost as it is to feel content.”
 
Miller’s Valley is a masterly study of family, memory, loss, and, ultimately, discovery, of finding true identity and a new vision of home. As Mimi says, “No one ever leaves the town where they grew up, even if they go.” Miller’s Valley reminds us that the place where you grew up can disappear, and the people in it too, but all will live on in your heart forever.
 
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. PLEASE RSVP TO voelcker@princeton.edu.

February 28, 2017 (All day)
Laci Green, Sex education activist
TBD

More Information Coming Soon

March 2, 2017 -
4:30pm to 6:00pm

2017 Meredith Miller Memorial Lecture with Kimberlé Crenshaw
McCormick 101

Kimberlé Crenshaw teaches Civil Rights and other courses in critical race studies and constitutional law. Her primary scholarly interests center around race and the law, and she was a founder and has been a leader in the intellectual movement called Critical Race Theory. She was elected Professor of the Year by the 1991 and 1994 graduating classes. She now splits her time each year between UCLA and the Columbia School of Law.
At the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she received her LL.M., Professor Crenshaw was a William H. Hastie Fellow. She then clerked for Justice Shirley Abrahamson of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.
Professor Crenshaw's publications include Critical Race Theory (edited by Crenshaw, et al., 1995) and Words that Wound: Critical Race Theory, Assaultive Speech and the First Amendment (with Matsuda, et al., 1993).
In 2007, Professor Crenshaw was awarded the Fulbright Chair for Latin America in Brazil.  In 2008, she was nominated an Alphonse Fletcher Fellow.  In the same year she joined the selective group of scholars awarded with an in-residence fellowship at the Center of Advanced Behavioral Studies at Stanford.
You can find out more about Professor Crenshaw's work through her think tank, The African American Policy Forum, at http://aapf.org/.
 
Reception to follow at Prospect House Presidential Dining Room.
 
More information coming soon!

March 8, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

GSS Workshop: Tala Khanmalek
230 Dickinson Hall

"Theory in the Flesh: Towards a New Politics of Illness and Identity”
 Co-sponsored by the Program in American Studies.
 
Lunch will be provided. Please call 258‐1835 or email voelcker@princeton.edu for reservations. If provided, copies of the papers can be requested by email one week before the workshop.

March 28, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

GSS Workshop: Wendy Warren
Greene Hall, 2nd Floor, 2-C-19 (Social Lounge)

"The Ethics of Recovering Interpersonal Violence: A Historian's Dilemma”
 
Lunch will be provided. Please call 258‐1835 or email voelcker@princeton.edu for reservations. If provided, copies of the papers can be requested by email one week before the workshop.

March 30, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

GSS Book Club - "How to Make White People Laugh" by Negin Farsad
113 Dickinson Hall

From the acclaimed writer, director, and star of the hit documentary The Muslims are Coming! comes a memoir in essays about growing up Iranian-American in a post-9/11 world and the power of comedy to combat racism. 
 
Negin Farsad is an Iranian-American-Muslim female stand-up comedian who believes she can change the world through jokes. And yes, sometimes that includes fart jokes. In this candid and uproarious book, Farsad shares her personal experiences growing up as the "other" in an American culture that has no time for nuance. In fact, she longed to be black and/or Mexican at various points of her youth, you know, like normal kids. Right? RIGHT?
 
Writing bluntly and hilariously about the elements of race we are often too politically correct to discuss, Farsad takes a long hard look at the iconography that still shapes our concepts of "black," "white," and "Muslim" today-and what it means when white culture defines the culture. Farsad asks the important questions like, What does it mean to have a hyphenated identity? How can we actually combat racism, stereotyping, and exclusion? Do Iranians get bunions at a higher rate than other ethnic groups? (She's asking for a friend.)
 
How to Make White People Laugh tackles these questions with wit, humor, and incisive intellect. And along the way, you might just learn a thing or two about tetherball, Duck Dynasty, and wine slushies.
 
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. PLEASE RSVP TO voelcker@princeton.edu.

April 20, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

GSS Book Club - "You'll Grow Out of It" - by Jessi Klein
113 Dickinson Hall

As both a tomboy and a late bloomer, comedian Jessi Klein grew up feeling more like an outsider than a participant in the rites of modern femininity.
 
In You'll Grow Out of It Klein offers-through an incisive collection of real-life stories-a relentlessly funny yet poignant take on a variety of topics she has experienced along her strange journey to womanhood and beyond. These include her "transformation from Pippi Longstocking-esque tomboy to are-you-a-lesbian-or-what tom man," attempting to find watchable porn, and identifying the difference between being called "ma'am" and "miss" ("Miss sounds like you weigh ninety-nine pounds").
 
Raw, relatable, and consistently hilarious, You'll Grow Out of It is a one-of-a-kind book by a singular and irresistible comic voice.
 
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. PLEASE RSVP TO voelcker@princeton.edu

April 27, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:20pm

GSS Workshop: Mara Mills
210 Dickinson Hall

(New York University), "Words Per Minute: Time Compression in the 1970s, from Talking Books to Television”
Co-sponsored by the Disability Studies Working Group in GSS.
 
Lunch will be provided. Please call 258‐1835 or email voelcker@princeton.edu for reservations. If provided, copies of the papers can be requested by email one week before the workshop.

May 18, 2017 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm

GSS Book Club - "A Body, Undone" by Christina Crosby
113 Dickinson Hall

In the early evening on October 1, 2003, Christina Crosby was three miles into a seventeen mile bicycle ride, intent on reaching her goal of 1,000 miles for the riding season. She was a respected senior professor of English who had celebrated her fiftieth birthday a month before. As she crested a hill, she caught a branch in the spokes of her bicycle, which instantly pitched her to the pavement. Her chin took the full force of the blow, and her head snapped back. In that instant, she was paralyzed.
 
In A Body, Undone, Crosby puts into words a broken body that seems beyond the reach of language and understanding. She writes about a body shot through with neurological pain, disoriented in time and space, incapacitated by paralysis and deadened sensation. To address this foreign body, she calls upon the readerly pleasures of narrative, critical feminist and queer thinking, and the concentrated language of lyric poetry. Working with these resources, she recalls her 1950s tomboy ways in small-town, rural Pennsylvania, and records growing into the 1970s through radical feminism and the affirmations of gay liberation.

Deeply unsentimental, Crosby communicates in unflinching prose the experience of "diving into the wreck" of her body to acknowledge grief, and loss, but also to recognize the beauty, fragility, and dependencies of all human bodies. A memoir that is a meditation on disability, metaphor, gender, sex, and love, A Body, Undone is a compelling account of living on, as Crosby rebuilds her body and fashions a life through writing, memory, and desire.
 
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED. PLEASE RSVP TO voelcker@princeton.edu.

June 5, 2017 -
2:30pm to 3:30pm

Class Day Reception
Prospect House Presidential Dining Room

Light refreshments will be served. Come and help us honor and celebrate our 2017 graduates.