Fall 2015

Playing Against Type

THR 308 / GSS 304 / LAO 308
Brian E. Herrera
W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This workshop course for actors, directors and scholars rehearses how to play with and against "type" in performance. The course uses scene- and monologue-study to press upon the limits of the conventions of typecasting. Course participants will experiment with cross-gender and cross-cultural casting; mask improvisation; conceptual casting; and performing across age, size, and ability. Throughout, the course engages relevant scholarly literature assessing the transformational act of taking on a role and uses in-class exercises, presentations and performances to press theory into practice (and vice versa).

Topics in Economic and Organizational Sociology (Half-Term) - Institutions, Class, and Social Capital

SOC 540 / GSS 540
Professor Alejandro Portes
Th 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

This six-week course explores selected themes in the field of economic sociology, beginning with classic contributions to its basic theoretical framework and the macro-assumptions that underline the field, and continuing with a review of key explanatory concepts applicable in a variety of contexts and to the analysis of a number of economic topics. Finally, we will examine some "strategic sites" for the application of the sociological lens to economic topics.

Women and Gender in Islamic Societies

REL 328 / GSS 328
Professor Shaun E. Marmon
T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Topics include: Women and the Law; Women and Sexuality; Gender and Seclusion; Women and Modernity; Gender and Post-Colonial Societies; Women's Voices; Women and Film; Politics of Women's Bodies; Women and Modern Islamic Revivalism. No prior background in Islam or Gender Studies required. Readings from fields of history, religious studies, anthropology, sociology and politics. Weekly primary sources in translation include: religious texts, popular literature, court records, letters, novels, poetry, autobiography, newspapers and films with subtitles.

The Buddhist Individual

REL 308 / GSS 338 / ART 387 / HUM 338
Professor Eric R. Huntington
Th 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

How does a tradition portray an individual, and how does an individual see themselves within a tradition? From epics of kings to private visionary experiences, the relationship of the individual to the tradition is a central theme of Buddhism. This course examines different conceptions of the individual by looking at numerous examples, including devoted patrons, accomplished masters, and struggling practitioners. Major themes include the structure of early Buddhist society, the roles of women, and autobiography. Topics will be drawn from 2,000 years of literature and artwork from India and Tibet.

Psychology of Gender

PSY 329 / GSS 329
Professor Keiko T. Brynildsen
M W 11:00 am - 11:50 am

Gender is a topic with which everybody feels intimately familiar. Indeed, people hold strong beliefs about how women and men are similar to and different from each other and about why gender differences exist. This course holds those beliefs up to scientific scrutiny, examining major theories and empirical findings in psychological research on gender. Topics include empirical comparisons of men and women, gender stereotypes and their perpetuation, and the role of gender and gendered beliefs in interpersonal relationships and physical and psychological well-being.

Interest Groups and Social Movements in American Politics and Policy

POL 543 / GSS 543
Professor Dara Z. Strolovitch
T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

This course engages theoretical and empirical work about interest groups and social movements in American politics and policy-making. We examine theories of interest group and social movement formation, maintenance and decline; how interest groups and social movements attempt to influence public policy; the impact of interest groups and social movements; lobbying; the relationships between interest groups and the three branches of the federal government; interest groups, elections, campaign finance, PACs, and 527s; and the effectiveness of interest groups and social movements as agents of democratic representation.

Bioethics, Sex and Society in Muslim Communities

NES 361/GSS 366
Professor Satyel K. Larson
T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

There is growing interest today in bioethics and how human beings form ethical subjectivities during embodied life-crisis events such as pregnancy, birth, illness and death. This course examines how various Muslim communities use their cultural and textual heritages to respond to the challenges of new technologies and biomedicine in questions related to the beginnings of life. We will consider how Muslims cultivate ethical subjectivities in increasingly global localities, and the gender politics of reproduction and fertility.

Youth and Youth Movements in the Modern Middle East

NES 327 / GSS 326
Professor Sara D. Pursley
T Th 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM

The course will examine the experiences of young people as a lens onto the texture of everyday life in the Middle East, including during the historical upheavals of decolonization, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the 1979 Iranian revolution, the Lebanese Civil War, and the Arab Spring. We will also look at a variety of oppositional youth movements over the past century; political and cultural, secular and Islamic, reformist and revolutionary; to explore questions around generational ruptures and affinities, as well as how these might relate to other affiliations such as those of nation, class, and gender.

Approaches and Paradigms in the Study of Women and Gender in the Middle East and North Africa

NES 227/GSS 227
Satyel K. Larson
M W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm

This course provides a broad-ranging survey of the study of women and gender in the Middle East and North Africa. Its aim is two-fold: to introduce beginners to the main concepts and themes of scholarly research in the humanities and social sciences during the last century, focusing on women and gender in regions where there are significant Muslim communities; and, to examine how human beings in a variety of historical and cultural contexts in the Middle East and North Africa experience or have experienced gender - what it means to be or become a man or a woman, and the power relations that inhere in gender as a social institution.

Approaches and Paradigms in the Study of Women and Gender in the Middle East and North Africa

NES 227/GSS 227
Satyel K. Larson
M W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm

This course provides a broad-ranging survey of the study of women and gender in the Middle East and North Africa. Its aim is two-fold: to introduce beginners to the main concepts and themes of scholarly research in the humanities and social sciences during the last century, focusing on women and gender in regions where there are significant Muslim communities; and, to examine how human beings in a variety of historical and cultural contexts in the Middle East and North Africa experience or have experienced gender - what it means to be or become a man or a woman, and the power relations that inhere in gender as a social institution.

Pages