Courses
Introduction to Global LGBTQ Studies
Justin Perez, T Th 11:00 am - 12:20 pm

This course provides an interdisciplinary and transnational introduction to the study of LGBTQ lives. We address the historical emergence of LGBTQ identities and survey how these identities are experienced among different communities around the world. Through global case studies, we examine key concepts and debates in the field, including intersectionality, human rights, homonationalism, normativity, and medicalization. We analyze how LGBTQ works as a meaningful social, political, and historical category and the ways class, race, gender, and nationality intersect with and disrupt it.

Science After Feminism
Catherine Clune-Taylor , W 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Science is commonly held to be the objective, empirical pursuit of natural facts about the world. In this course, we will consider an array of theoretical, methodological, and substantive challenges that feminism has posed for this account of science, and for the practice of scientific knowledge production. In the course of this survey, we shall engage a number of key questions such as: is science gendered, racialized, ableist or classist? Does the presence or absence of women (and another marginalized individuals) lead to the production of different kinds of scientific knowledge?

Gender Crossings in American Musical Theater
Brian E. Herrera , M W 11:00 am - 12:20 pm

This course offers an intensive survey of gender crossings on the American musical theater stage. The course's study of American musicals (in terms of form, content and context) will be anchored in a historical exploration of world theatrical traditions of cross-gender performance. The course will examine multiple modes of cross-gender performance, while also considering musicals that stage gender role reversals and those that open questions of gender expression and identity.

Pleasure, Power and Profit: Race and Sexualities in a Global Era
Anne McClintock , T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Pleasure Power and Profit explores the intimate ways that sexualities and race are entwined in contemporary culture, historically, and in our own lives. Why are questions about sexuality and race some of the most controversial, compelling, yet often taboo issues of our time? Exploring films, popular culture, novels, social media, and theory, we engage themes like: race, gender and empire; fetishism, Barbie, vampires and zombies; sex work and pornography; marriage and monogamy; queer sexualities; and strategies for social empowerment such as: Black Lives Matter, the new campus feminism, and global movements against sexual and gender violence.

Media Spectacles, Scandalous Citizens and Democratic Possibilities
Melissa Deem , Th 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Our contemporary mediascape is saturated with spectacle and scandal. In this class, we take this observation and examine, not only the logics that undergird these discursive events, but also the intimate connection between media spectacles and scandals and the regulation of non-normative bodies and speech. This class will examine the manner in which non-normative subjects and practices are hyperembodied, surveilled, stigmatized and disciplined through practices that often cast them as outside of a democratic ethos. Spectacles that might be examined include The Women's March, Trigger Warnings, Black Lives Matter, and Travel Bans.

Contemporary Theories of Gender and Sexuality
Gayle Salamon , T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

One is not born, but becomes, woman. So writes Simone deBeauvoir in her landmark work of feminism, The Second Sex. But how do we become women, anyway? In this course we will read The Second Sex in its entirety, exploring Beauvoir's ideas, along with our current ones, about childhood, coming of age, the family, sexuality, relationships, work, the social order, and the philosophical imaginary. We will read Beauvoir alongside the work of her primary interlocutors as well as contemporary theory, memoir, and fiction considering the question of what it means to become a woman--or not--in contemporary culture.

Classical Mythology
Joshua H. Billings , T Th 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm

An introduction to the classical myths in their cultural context and in their wider application to human concerns (such as creation, sex and gender, identity, transformation, and death). The course will offer a who's who of the ancient imaginative world, study the main ancient sources of well known stories, and introduce modern approaches to analyzing myths.

FAT: The F-Word and the Public Body
Judith Hamera, T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

This seminar investigates discourses and politics around the fat body from a performance studies perspective. How does this "f-word" discipline and regulate bodies in /as public? How do dancers reveal these politics with special clarity? How might fat be a liberating counterperformance? We will examine the changing history, aesthetics, politics, and meanings of fatness using dance, performance, and media texts as key case studies. Intersectional dimensions of the fat body are central to the course. Emphasis primarily on the US. Assignments include written work and group performances. No dance experience necessary.

Topics in the History of Sex and Gender - Gender and Science
Erika L. Milam , T 9:00 am - 11:50 am

The seminar begins by exploring classic scholarship centered on four historical periods, each posited as important moments in the origin of gendered science: medieval Christianity, the scientific revolution, the professionalization of scientists in the late-19th century, and 20th-century second-wave feminism. We then turn to a series of well-developed analytical tools employed by historians of science and gender, and finally to recent scholarship. In all cases, we will analyze the imbricated processes by which science as a social enterprise has been fundamentally gendered and the implicit gendering of the sciences of sex and sexuality.

Medical Story-Worlds
Elena Fratto, Tala Khanmalek , T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

This seminar explores illness, health, and the body using storytelling as an entry point. Specifically, it examines how science, subjectivity, and social difference—including race, class, gender, and sexuality—are articulated on a global scale. The 1920s construction of the “New Soviet Man” resonates with histories of medical discrimination in the U.S.; early Soviet studies on biomechanics and the body as a machine illuminate current debates around disability and contemporary health disparities; the Russian tradition of the ‘holy fool’ jumpstarts a discussion of neurodiversity. Guest lecturers from across the Sciences and the Humanities, as well as a Theatre of the Oppressed Group, will each teach a class in their own institutional “space.”

Black, Queer, Jewish Italy
Alessandro Giammei , Th 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm

This seminar approaches the two most studied phases of Italian history, the Renaissance and the 20th Century, by placing otherness at the center of the picture rather than at its margins. We will look at pivotal events and phenomena (the rise of Humanism, the rise of fascism, courtly culture, the two World Wars, 16th century art, the avant-garde) from the point of view of non-white, non-Christian, non-heterosexual witnesses, authors, and fictional characters. We will adopt a trans-historical, intersectional, and interdisciplinary perspective: themes will be analyzed at the crossing of the two historical phases and of the three topics in exam.

Feminist Approaches to Bioethics
Professor Catherine Clune-Taylor, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course is divided into four units, each unit introducing varieties of feminist engagements with bioethics, key feminist arguments and concerns, as well as contemporary debates both within feminist bioethics and regarding feminist engagement in bioethics. This course will examine the history of bioethics, as feminist critiques of its core principles-most notably autonomy-before moving on to examine debates among feminist bioethicists regarding key issues in the field. These include the importance and value of care; abortion and reproductive rights; the importance of intersectionality to bioethical analyses; and the obesity epidemic.

Corporealities of Politics
Professor Tala Khanmalek, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

What do feminists of color have to say about how the social determinants of health affect our bodies? In this seminar, we will explore the ways in which feminists of color narrate the impact of multiple oppressions on their well/being. The readings begin with an overview of key concepts in women of color and transnational feminisms including but not limited to intersectionality and theory in the flesh, which we will draw on to think about the materiality of difference.

Writing the Body: Fiction and Creative Non-Fiction
Professor Anne McClintock, TTh 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

The goal of this course is to help you find your unique, creative voice by writing the body. We devote each class to two things: work-shopping your stories or essays in an intimate, collaborate environment; and engaging some of the most exciting published writers of our time. Themes include: bodies of pleasure, sexualities, race, pain, desire, trauma, memory, bodies in extremity, bodies in transformation, animal bodies, earthly and unearthly. We will come to our senses, opening our eyes and ears to the sensuous world.

Graphic Memoir
Professor Alfred Bendixen, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

An exploration of the graphic memoir focusing on the ways specific works combine visual imagery and language to expand the possibilities of autobiographical narrative. Through our analysis of highly acclaimed graphic memoirs from the American, Franco-Belgian, and Japanese traditions, we analyze the visual and verbal constructions of identity with an emphasis on the representation of gender dynamics and cultural conflict.

Contemporary Theories of Gender and Sexuality
Professor Gayle Salamon, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

One is not born, but becomes, woman. So writes Simone deBeauvoir in her landmark work of feminism, The Second Sex. But how do we become women, anyway? In this course we will read The Second Sex in its entirety, exploring Beauvoir's ideas, along with our current ones, about childhood, coming of age, the family, sexuality, relationships, work, the social order, and the philosophical imaginary. We will read Beauvoir alongside the work of her primary interlocutors as well as contemporary theory, memoir, and fiction considering the question of what it means to become a woman--or not--in contemporary culture.

Born in the U.S.A.: Culture and Reproduction in Modern America
Professor Elizabeth Armstrong, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Reproduction is a basic biological process, as well as a fundamental one for all societies. While the biology of human reproduction is universal across time and place, cultural norms and social institutions powerfully inflect and shape the experience of pregnancy and childbirth in every society. This course investigates the history and sociology of reproduction, focusing on the contemporary United States, but with an eye toward other societies for comparison. How, why, and for whom does birth matter? How do reproductive practices reflect gender, race, and class? The course examines the culture, politics, and economics of reproduction.

Intersectional Activisms and Movements for Social Justice
Professor Dara Z. Strolovitch, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Examines the role of intersectionality roots as a political intervention growing out of and based in movement politics. Begins with early articulations of intersectional perspectives on the part of Black feminists and feminists of colour, emphasizing its movement roots. Examines empirical research about social movements and political activism, focusing on scholarship that considers both the potential of and the challenges to movements that try to address the imbrication of racial inequalities with other forms of marginalization and domination, including (though not limited to) heteropatriarchy, capitalism, abelism, and the carceral state.

Making Gender: Bodies, Meanings, Voices
Professor Rena S. Lederman, TTH 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

How do gendered and sexual identities, relationships, and meanings differ and how are they similar across cultural and historical contexts? This course illustrates the uses of fieldwork and other anthropological methods in answering questions about the universality or particularity of gendered experience. We draw on theories about human nature, cultural meaning, and linguistic and social structures, power, and agency to understand representations of maleness, femaleness, and other sexed/gendered distinctions, to explore how such representations are made and remade, and to relate them to other kinds of social difference and inequality.

Gendered Fictions of Translation
Professor Karen R. Emmerich, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Translation is a marginalized literary activity; the work of female translators, and of international female writers, is underrepresented in the current publishing market. At the same time, fictive representations of translators, and particularly female translators, abound. This course examines the gendered politics of invisibility that informs popular discourse surrounding translation. We will read primarily works of fiction by women, translated by women, and/or about a female translator. The course thus enacts its own politics of selection, upending gendered statistics regarding whose work we read, and how.

Crafting Freedom: Women and Liberation in the Americas (1960s to the present)
Professor Susana Draper, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course explores the question of liberation in writings by women philosophers and poets whose work helped to create cultural and political movements in the U.S. and Latin America. Starting in the 60s, we will study a poetics and politics of liberation, paying special attention to the role played by language and imagination when ideas translate onto social movements related to abolition, education, care, and the commons. Readings include Angela Davis, Gloria Anzaldúa, Silvia Federici, Diamela Eltit, Audre Lorde, Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui, Gayatri Spivak, Zapatistas, among others.

Queens, Courtesans, Nuns, and Workers: Korean Women in History
Professor Ksenia Chizhova, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Over the course of history Korean women assumed a variety of roles that reflected the specific cultural, social, and political realities of their lives. While the organization of this course is more topic-oriented and not strictly chronological, we will cover the period that spans from the seventeenth century to the 1930s. Focusing our attention on such aspects of women's lives as family roles, literacy, work, sexuality, and activities in the public space, we will look into the circumstances that allowed women to become queens, courtesans, nuns, modern girls, writers, and workers in different historical contexts.

American Identities in the 21st Century
Professor Alfred Bendixen, MW 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

How do American writers represent diverse and fluid identities in the new millennium? How does the literary imagination engage new views of sexuality and gender, respond to political and personal violence, and confront racial, social, and economic injustice? This course explores these questions in recent works by Adichie, Alexie, Bechdel, Morrison, and others.

Queer Theory
Professor Gayle Salamon, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

In this course, we will read extensively in the interdisciplinary field of queer theory, from its emergence two decades ago to its present-day articulations. We will explore what is meant by "queer," what relation it may or may not have to "homosexuality" and "gay" and lesbian," and what challenges it poses to a politics of identity. We will also interrogate the category of "theory" itself--what it is, what it does, and what kinds of literary or historical interventions it can perform. Particular attention will be paid to the queering and de-queering of public space.

French and American Comparative Feminism
Professor Christy N. Wampole, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Comparative readings of canonical theoretical feminist texts in 20th-century France and the U.S., including texts by Beauvoir, Butler, Hooks, Cixous, Kristeva, Lorde, Irigaray, Harraway, Condé, Le Guin, Preciado, Wittig, and Tiqqun. Some topics addressed: first- through fourth-wave feminism, pornography, Riot Grrrl, the veil/burqa/burkini in the public space, the Dominique Strauss-Kahn incident, Femen, abortion, fashion and beauty, race and social class, sexual violence and the campus, French parity laws, street harassment, maternity politics, political correctness, queer politics, ecofeminism. Graduate students encouraged to enroll.

Gender and Illness Experience in the United States Today
Professor Amy B. Krauss, TH 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course explores how gender is integral to constructions of health and illness. How do techniques of knowledge production in law, biomedicine, and public health rely on and invent ideas about gender difference? How is gender embodied in individual and collective experiences of suffering and affliction? How are such bodily experiences cross-cut by other conditions of social life, such as; culture, race, class, ethnicity, nationality and migration? The course combines readings in anthropology, literature, women’s and gender studies, and critical theory to explore these questions in the contemporary context of the United States.

The History of Incarceration in the U.S.
Professor Regina Kunzel, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

The prison is a growth industry in the U.S.; it is also a central institution in U.S. political and social life, shaping our experience of race, class, gender, sexuality, citizenship, and political possibility. This course explores the history of incarceration over the course of more than two centuries. It tracks the emergence of the penitentiary in the early national period and investigates mass incarceration of the late 20th century. Topics include the relationship between the penitentiary and slavery; the prisoners' rights movement; Japanese internment; immigration detention; and the privatization and globalization of prisons.

Cuban Biopolitics: Gender, Race and Sexuality in the Long Twentieth Century
Professor Adrian Lopez-Denis, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

The Cuban revolution has been one of the most radical sociopolitical experiments of the past century. Comparing historiographical accounts with the recollections of individuals involved in the actual events, this course investigates the impact of the revolutionary process on the complex interplays between race, gender and sexuality. Participants are encouraged to chronicle how their own personal understanding of these interplays is illuminated, confirmed or challenged by their research. We will travel to Havana, Cuba during the spring break to conduct further onsite research.

Global Feminisms: Feminist Movements in the Middle East and Beyond
Professor Satyel Larson, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course explores how feminist thought & activism circulates globally by examining a variety of feminist movements in the Middle East & North Africa. Beginning with modern feminist thought and activism in mid-19th century Syria & Egypt, we'll trace feminist movements in various contemporary contexts, from Morocco, Iran, Turkey, Tunisia, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon & Egypt in the 20th century, to women's participation in the Arab Spring and transnational Islamic movements in the 21st century. We'll map the local and geopolitical discourses that have shaped regional feminisms, and ask how local feminisms are transnational or global.

Ethnography of Gender and Islam
Professor Satyel Larson, TH 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

The 21st century has witnessed the explosion of public and scholarly interest in gender in Islamic cultures. Within this context, anthropology has advanced path-breaking approaches in diverse localities from the Middle East to the United States. This course surveys theoretical and ethnographic approaches to the study of women, gender and sexuality in Islamic cultures, focusing on work written in the last decade.

Seminar in American Politics - Gender and American Politics
Professor Dara Z. Strolovitch, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines the ways in which gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by American politics and public policy, focusing in particular on the ways in which gender and sexuality intersect with other politically relevant categories, identities, and forms of marginalization, such as race, ethnicity, class, and ideological and partisan identification.

Saints and Sinners: Women and the Church in Colonial Spanish America
Professor Jessica Delgado, TTH 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM

An introductory exploration of women's experience of and participation in the Catholic Church and colonial Christianity in Spanish America. Through primary sources, secondary readings, lectures, and discussion, we will look at women's roles in the processes of conquest and colonization; how conversion and religious change affected gender ideologies and gender relations within indigenous communities; women's daily encounters with the church and participation in devotional culture; and the ways women's complex relationships with the colonial church was shaped by race and social status.

Gender and Performing Arts in South Asia
Professor Robert L. Phillips, MW 1:30 PM - 2:50 PM

How has the nexus of gender, society, and the performing arts been theorized, constructed, and experienced at different times and in different places in South Asian societies? What have been the impacts of modernity on the performing arts in South Asia? In exploring these and related questions we will draw from music, dance, film, literature, and ethnographic and historical sources as we consider the complexities of social and cultural discourses in relation to the performing arts.

Seminar in Modern Spanish-American Literature - On the Materiality of Sex
Professor Javier E. Guerrero, TH 5:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Can the body disobey the limits imposed by the materiality of sex? Is it possible to disorganize the binary opposition without reinforcing its normativity? Can gender have a decisive bearing on bodily materiality? My seminar answers these questions, exploring the work of Latin American artists who aim to defy the norms imposed by the heterosexual imperative. Their own bodies generate a response, which arises from their compulsive need to call attention to their matter. I propose that the possibility of a new body depends on fiction and visuality to enable the deactivation of culture's normalizing categories.

Women / Writing / Cinema
Professor Rebekah A. Rutkoff, TH 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course will be structured around female artists, both contemporary and historical, whose work exists at the crossroads of writing and moving images. These women include Chantal Akerman, Mona Hatoum, Agnes Varda, Zora Neale Hurston, Renata Adler, Kathleen Collins, Virginia Woolf, Lynne Tillman, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Chick Strand, Yvonne Rainer, and Hito Steyerl. Discussions will focus on creative texts drawn from filmic sources, films that function as scenes of writing, and in-class creative workshops - all augmented by visits from practicing women artists. Students will be encouraged to produce multi-media work based on their writing.

Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
Professor Gayle Salamon, MW 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM, M 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

What does it mean to be a woman or a man? Or neither? How do gender and sexuality, those seemingly most personal and private of attributes, emerge from networks of power and social relations? This course introduces major concepts in the interdisciplinary field of gender and sexuality studies. We will analyze the ways in which gender, as an object of study and as a lived experience, intersects with class, race, and ability, and will examine the relation between gender, sexuality and power in literary, philosophical, political and medical discourses.

Disability and the Politics of Life
Professor Catherine Clune-Taylor, W 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

This introduction to disability studies draws together the work of feminists and queer theorists with that of historians and clinicians in order to contextualize the field's major theoretical claims. We will take up and critique the oft-made distinction between natural, physical impairment and socially constructed disability, situating it with regards to Michel Foucault's account of biopower, and his controversial claims in Society Must Be Defended regarding "racism against the abnormal."

Pleasure, Power and Profit: Race and Sexualities in a Global Era
Professor Anne McClintock , T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Pleasure Power and Profit explores the intimate ways that sexualities and race are entwined in contemporary culture, historically, and in our own lives. Why are questions about sexuality and race some of the most controversial, compelling, yet often taboo issues of our time? Exploring films, popular culture, novels, social media, and theory, we engage themes like: race, gender and empire; fetishism, Barbie, vampires and zombies; sex work and pornography; marriage and monogamy; queer sexualities; and strategies for social empowerment such as: Black Lives Matter, the new campus feminism, and global movements against sexual and gender violence.

Isn't It Romantic? The Broadway Musical from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Sondheim
Professor Stacy E. Wolf, T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Song. Dance. Man. Woman. These are the basic components of the Broadway musical theatre. How have musical theatre artists, composers, lyricists, librettists, directors, choreographers, and designers worked with these building blocks to create this quintessentially American form of art and entertainment? Why are musicals structured by love and romance? This course will explore conventional and resistant performances of gender and sexuality in the Broadway musical since the 1940s.

Media Spectacles, Scandalous Citizens and Democratic Possibilities
Professor Melissa Deem , Th 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Our contemporary mediascape is saturated with spectacle and scandal. In this class, we take this observation and examine, not only the logics that undergird these discursive events, but also the intimate connection between media spectacles and scandals and the regulation of non-normative bodies and speech. This class will examine the manner in which non-normative subjects and practices are hyperembodied, surveilled, stigmatized and disciplined through practices that often cast them as outside of a democratic ethos. Spectacles that might be examined include Gamergate, Trigger Warnings, Black Lives Matter, Civility, and Campus Sexual Assault.

Gender and Sexuality in American Politics and Policy
Professor Dara Z. Strolovitch, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines the ways in which gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by U.S. politics and public policy, emphasizing intersections with other categories, identities, and forms of marginalization including race, ethnicity, class, ideology, and partisan identification. We examine the history, approaches, and controversies in research about gender and sexuality in U.S. politics from a range of theoretical and methodological approaches. We also explore feminist, queer, and intersectional theories and methodologies, related work from other disciplines, and research that does not fit neatly into traditional disciplinary categories.

20th Century Master - Lorraine Hansberry
Professor Imani Perry, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This special topics course will focus on artists and intellectuals whose corpus reflects and illuminates 20th century African American life. Lorraine Hansberry, the first African American female playwright to have a play open on Broadway, explored a series of critical themes in her work, including: race, migration, colonialism, gender and social class. In addition to having a distinguished career as a playwright, Hansberry was an activist and advocate for gender and racial justice. Students will study her published and unpublished plays, essays and poetry, as well as relevant social and cultural history and literary criticism.

Sexuality and Religion in America
Professor Wallace D. Best , W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

The course examines the crucial relationship between sexuality and American religion, particularly in Catholic and Protestant Christian traditions. We focus particularly on the way in which religiously informed notions of sex and sexuality have touched every area of American life, including popular culture, politics, and the law. Lastly, we interrogate issues of sexual policing, sexual freedom, race and sexuality ("the closet" and "down low" performance and practice), the limits of desire, Christian ethics, homosexuality, and the politics of sexuality.

Race and Living Laboratories
Tala Khanmalek, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

In this course we will trace the intersecting discourses of race, nation, and disease throughout US history. We will examine various "living laboratories" or sites of state-sanctioned medical experimentation on populations such as Asian American, African American and Latinx, deemed to harbor disease. In doing so, we will consider the ways in which science has shaped the meaning of race as well as other categories of social difference.

Classical Mythology
Professor Brooke A. Holmes, TTh 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM

An introduction to the classical myths in their cultural context and in their wider application to human concerns (such as creation, sex and gender, identity, transformation, and death). The course will offer a who's who of the ancient imaginative world, study the main ancient sources of well known stories, and introduce modern approaches to analyzing myths.

Script, Screen, and Sexuality in East Asia
Professor Ayako Kano , T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course focuses on representations of gender and sexuality in East Asia, including theatrical traditions and their cinematic adaptations, documentary films, short fiction, graphic novels, animation, and music videos. It will introduce students to fundamental texts in sexuality and gender studies, to the contours of East Asian culture, and to the challenges of orientalist perspectives. Sexuality and performance will be examined within the context of cultural, political, and economic exchange. We will also consider the ways in which our knowledge of the lives of people in East Asia is constructed and constrained. Freshmen are welcome.

Seminar. Types of Ideology and Literary Form - Pornography, Gender and the Rise of the Novel in Europe
Professor April Alliston , W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Open to graduate and undergraduate students interested in understanding the origins of the modern novel, this seminar examines the profound historical, theoretical and formal connections between the development of pornography as a distinct category of representation and the development of the novel as a literary genre during the Enlightenment. We will also explore the continuing resonances of those connections today. Readings in current criticism, history and theory of the novel and pornography will accompany primary readings.

Special Topics in Creative Writing - Writing Political Fiction
Professor A.M. Homes , T 9:00 AM - 10:50 AM

In traditional workshops content and context come second to craft. Here we will explore writing political fiction, the politics of fiction and writing as political engagement. We'll read widely, from the most realistic depictions of the American political process and the varieties of immigrant experience to the work of afrofuturists and feminists. The personal is the political and our frame will range from the global to the domestic. We will write stories that inhabit experiences other than our own. This course will allow students to make interdisciplinary connections between courses on history, politics and identity and creative writing.

FAT: The F-Word and the Public Body
Professor Judith Hamera , Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This seminar investigates discourses and politics around the fat body from a performance studies perspective. How does this "f-word" discipline and regulate bodies in /as public? How do dancers reveal these politics with special clarity? How might fat be a liberating counterperformance? We will examine the changing history, aesthetics, politics, and meanings of fatness using dance, performance, and media texts as key case studies. Intersectional dimensions of the fat body are central to the course. Emphasis primarily on the US. Assignments include written work and group performances. No dance experience necessary.

Empire of the Ark: The Animal Question in Film, Photography and Popular Culture
Professor Anne McClintock , W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course explores the current fascination with animals in film, photography and popular culture, engaging central issues in animal and environmental studies. Why has looking become our main way of interacting with animals? How does rethinking animals inspire us to rethink being human? How can we transform our relations with other species and the planet? Course themes include: wilderness, national parks and zoos; the cult of the pet; vampires, werewolves and zombies; animal speech, animal emotions and rights; nature, sexuality and race. Exploring planetary crises such as extinction and climate change, and positive strategies for change.

Millennial Feminism
Professor Melissa Deem, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Young women have come to occupy a highly contested and visible place within the popular circulation of feminism. Recently, former Secretary of State Madeline Albright chastised young women concerning their "debt" to Hillary Clinton and an earlier generation of women/feminists. Young women of the Millennial Generation are seen as both rejecting feminism and as among the generation with more feminists than any that preceded it. Are there more young women feminists than ever before? Is feminism only for those who identify as female? What is feminism to you? How does your understanding of feminism fit within the various manifestations of gender politics today as well as the recent history of feminism? Does it even make sense to mark feminism as generational? Is feminism anachronistic? Popular understandings of the place of feminism within our recent history are often informed through the delectable images of television shows such as "Mad Men" or the liberal politics of Gloria Steinem. The dominant media images of feminism privilege an understanding of feminism as generational, always female, middle class, and white, while obscuring the multiplicity of practices and identities that have circulated under the sign of feminism. In this seminar, we will read contemporary media texts (blogs, documentaries) and feminist writing as well as texts produced during the movement generally called Second Wave Feminism in the late 1960s and 1970s. We will look at the concerns these texts articulate, the demands they make, and what is not in the texts. In this manner, the course attempts to expand the field of reference for what constitutes the recent history of feminism.

Approaches and Paradigms: Study of Women, Gender & Sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa
Professor Satyel Larson, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course provides a broad-ranging survey of the study of women and gender in the Middle East and North Africa. Its aim is two-fold: to introduce beginners to the main concepts and themes of scholarly research in the humanities and social sciences during the last century, focusing on women and gender in regions where there are significant Muslim communities; and, to examine how human beings in a variety of historical and cultural contexts in the Middle East and North Africa experience or have experienced gender - what it means to be or become a man or a woman, and the power relations that inhere in gender as a social institution.

Bioethics, Sex and Society in Muslim Communities
Professor Satyel Larson , Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

There is growing interest today in bioethics and how human beings form ethical subjectivities during embodied life-crisis events such as pregnancy, birth, illness and death. This course examines how various Muslim communities use their cultural and textual heritages to respond to the challenges of new technologies and biomedicine in questions related to the beginnings of life. We will consider how Muslims cultivate ethical subjectivities in increasingly global localities, and the gender politics of reproduction and fertility.

Psychology of Gender
Professor Keiko T. Brynildsen , MW 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Gender is a topic with which everybody feels intimately familiar. Indeed, people hold strong beliefs about how women and men are similar to and different from each other and about why gender differences exist. This course holds those beliefs up to scientific scrutiny, examining major theories and empirical findings in psychological research on gender. Topics include empirical comparisons of men and women, gender stereotypes and their perpetuation, and the role of gender and gendered beliefs in interpersonal relationships and physical and psychological well-being.

Women and Gender in Islamic Societies
Professor Shaun E. Marmon , T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Topics include: Women and the Law; Women and Sexuality; Gender and Seclusion; Women and Modernity; Gender and Post-Colonial Societies; Women's Voices; Women and Film; Politics of Women's Bodies; Women and Modern Islamic Revivalism. No prior background in Islam or Gender Studies required. Readings from fields of history, religious studies, anthropology, sociology and politics. Weekly primary sources in translation include: religious texts, popular literature, court records, letters, novels, poetry, autobiography, newspapers and films with subtitles.

Religion, Gender, and Sexuality in Early Latin America
Professor Jessica Delgado , W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This seminar explores scholarship on the history of religion, gender, and sexuality in Latin America, focusing primarily on the mainland colonial period (1492-1821), but including some pre-colonial and the nineteenth century material. Through historical studies, primary documents, and discussion, students will consider connections between religious beliefs, spiritual and sexual practices, gendered social relations, and the ways race, class, and gender intersected with ideas about moral and social order in the period under study. We will also think critically about how scholars have portrayed these subjects.

Introduction to Gender & Sexuality Studies
Gayle M. Salamon, MW 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

What does it mean to be a woman or a man? Or neither? How do gender and sexuality, those seemingly most personal and private of attributes, emerge from networks of power and social relations? This course introduces major concepts in the interdisciplinary field of gender and sexuality studies. We will analyze the ways in which gender, as an object of study and as a lived experience, intersects with class, race, and ability, and will examine the relation between gender, sexuality and power in literary, philosophical, political and medical discourses.

Queer Sexualities: Biopsychosocial and LGBT Perspectives
Debbie Bazarsky, W 1:30 PM- 4:20 PM

Queer Sexualities is an interdisciplinary course, which intertwines the study of human sexuality from scientific and public health perspectives with queer academic writing about sexual orientation and gender. Through the lenses of human sexuality theory, social science and medical perspectives, biological and sexual functioning, and LGBT history and subcultures, this course will explore the many ways in which queer sexualities, identities, and relationships are constructed, expressed, and regulated.

History and the Body
Regina Kunzel, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course introduces students to new scholarship on the history of the body and the shifting political and cultural contests over understandings of the "natural" or "normal" body. Through readings in gender and sexuality studies, history, and disability studies, as well as autobiography, film, and other primary sources, we will explore changes in the ways in which human bodies have been conceived and represented, and will consider the work of historians and cultural theorists who move further to historicize the lived experience of the human body.

Media Spectacles, Scandalous Citizens and Democratic Possibilities
Melissa Deem, Th 1:30 PM- 4:20 PM

Our contemporary mediascape is saturated with spectacle and scandal. In this class, we take this observation and examine, not only the logics that undergird these discursive events, but also the intimate connection between media spectacles and scandals and the regulation of non-normative bodies and speech. This class will examine the manner in which non-normative subjects and practices are hyperembodied, surveilled, stigmatized and disciplined through practices that often cast them as outside of a democratic ethos. Spectacles that might be examined include Gamergate, Trigger Warnings, Black Lives Matter, Civility, and Campus Sexual Assault.

Contemporary Theories of Gender and Sexuality
Professor Gayle M. Salamon , M 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

One is not born, but becomes, woman. So writes Simone deBeauvoir in her landmark work of feminism, The Second Sex. But how do we become women, anyway? In this course we will read The Second Sex in its entirety, exploring Beauvoir's ideas, along with our current ones, about childhood, coming of age, the family, sexuality, relationships, work, the social order, and the philosophical imaginary. We will read Beauvoir alongside the work of her primary interlocutors as well as contemporary theory, memoir, and fiction considering the question of what it means to become a woman--or not--in contemporary culture.

An Intro to Modern Caribbean Literature
Professor Nijah Cunningham, TTh 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

This course introduces students to major theories and debates within the study of Caribbean literature and culture with a particular focus on the idea of catastrophe. Reading novels and poetry that address the historical loss and injustices that have given shape to the modern Caribbean, we will explore questions of race, gender, and sexuality and pay considerable attention to the figure of the black body caught in the crosscurrents of a catastrophic history. We will analyze how writers and artists attempted to construct alternative images of the future from the histories of slavery and colonialism that haunt the Caribbean and its diasporas.

Queer Boyhoods
Professor Brian E. Herrera, M W 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

This course examines enactments of youthful masculinity in U.S. popular performance with a particular eye toward accounts of variant or queer boyhoods. As we scrutinize the regimentation and valorization of specific boyish behaviors, we will explore the cultural impact of non-normative youthful masculinities (ie. sissies, tomboys, bois, punks, transguys, etcetera) as we also assess the place of queer boyhoods in American life. Course readings will be historical, literary and theoretical, with play scripts, films, memoirs and literature for young readers functioning as primary objects for the course's analytic project.

Crime, Gender, and American Culture
Professor Alfred Bendixen, W 1:30 pm-4:20 pm

An exploration of the ways in which gender and crime are intertwined in some of the most significant and popular works of American fiction. Our analysis of the aesthetic, cultural, and psychological dimensions of narratives based on crime and detection will focus on texts by both women and men with an emphasis on the capacity of gender studies to illuminate American crime fiction's recurring concern with questions of race and class, justice and power, violence and victimhood.

Reproductive Politics in the United States and Abroad since 1945
Gillian A. Frank, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Questions of who should have access to abortion, adoption and birth control and who should be allowed to procreate and parent have underpinned major social struggles in the United States and abroad. How the state, medical experts, religious authorities, activists and everyday people have answered these questions has changed substantively over time and differed across and within cultures. This course takes an expansive view of the histories of reproductive politics in order to locate these debates within United States while situating the United States within a broader global conversation over reproductive access and justice.

Feminist Media Studies /Media Representations of Feminism
Professor Melissa Deem, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Feminist Media Studies/Media Representations of Feminism considers discourses of feminism that are not usually put in direct conversation. Feminist studies of media are a rich and varied field of inquiry, while feminism itself is a recurring object of media fascination. In public, media stories of feminism circulate as authoritative. Feminist arguments often become public spectacles where the media simultaneously leers at and dismisses feminist speech. In the process, these spectacularly public representations of feminism reduce the multiplicity of feminist positions and voices.

The Ethics of Love and Sex
Professor Elizabeth Harman , T Th 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm

An examination of the moral principles governing love and sex. Questions to be addressed include: Do we ever owe it to someone to love him or her? Do we owe different things to those we love? Do we owe it to a loved one to believe better of him than our evidence warrants? What is consent, and why is it morally significant? Is sex between consenting adults always permissible, and if not, why not? Are there good reasons for prohibiting prostitution and pornography? Everyone has opinions about these matters. The aim of the course is to subject those opinions to scrutiny.

Classical Mythology
, M W 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM

An introduction to the classical myths in their cultural context and in their wider application to human concerns (such as creation, sex and gender, identity, transformation, and death). The course will offer a who's who of the ancient imaginative world, study the main ancient sources of well known stories, and introduce modern approaches to analyzing myths.

Sex and Salvation in Early Christian Literature
Professor Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis , M W 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM

Why did sex become so prominent in the moral imagination of early Christianity? How did the fate of the soul become so dependent on the sexual discipline of Christians? We will read a wide variety of late antique and early medieval texts which explore, prescribe, and aestheticize physical love and relate its consequences for sin and salvation in later Roman society. The course will emphasize literary as well as social history.

Seminar. Types of Ideology and Literary Form - Pornography, Gender and the Rise of the Novel in Europe
Professor April Alliston , M 7:30 pm - 10:20 pm

Open to graduate and undergraduate students interested in understanding the origins of the modern novel, this seminar examines the profound historical, theoretical and formal connections between the development of pornography as a distinct category of representation and the development of the novel as a literary genre during the Enlightenment. We will also explore the continuing resonances of those connections today. Readings in current criticism, history and theory of the novel and pornography will accompany primary readings.

Sexuality, Public Culture and Medicine in East Asia
Professor Everett Y. Zhang , T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

This course addresses "sexuality" in relation to public culture and medical practices in contemporary East Asia (China, Japan and Korea). While discussing important theories, this course emphasizes social, cultural and historical contexts of sexual practices, such as China's post-Mao sexual revolution, Japan's emerging new femininity and masculinity, Korean aspiration for love. In showing the construction of normality/abnormality, this course highlights the centrality of sexual desire to one's subjectivity and continuous endeavors for the wellbeing of the population, communities and individuals and for the value of difference.

Anthropology of the Body: Theories and Practices in China & Beyond
Professor Everett Y. Zhang , Th 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Why the body? This course examines the rise of the notion of the body in anthropology and other fields. Engaging with major theorists of the body, it explores ethnographic advantage of the body as an analytical category of human existence, compared to notions of subject, agency, self and so on. It introduces a balanced perspective between bodily experience and social construction of the body by various forces (religious rituals, legal regulations, scientific knowledge, political protocols, medical practices, disciplines, and popular culture), and explores different bodies and the complex relationship between the body and life.

Intimacy Beyond Borders: Transnational Histories of Sexuality
Professor Regina Kunzel & Professor David L. Minto , T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

What happens to sexuality--that most intimate of domains--when viewed from beyond the boundedness of the nation state? How, for instance, have sex and erotic desire been implicated in imperial power and international relations? What cross-border circulations have informed the construction and politics of sexual categories? How have sexual subjectivities been linked to diaspora and migration? How has sexual behavior been affected by transnational events, like wars? Topics encountered in our explorations will include prostitution networks, anti-colonial homophobia, sex tourism, AIDS in global perspective, and the cultures of queer expatriates.

Topics in the History of Sex and Gender - History of Sexuality
Professor Regina Kunzel , W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

A survey of important work in the history of sexuality, seeking to understand sexuality not only as a topic of historical inquiry but as a category of analysis. Seminar focuses on U.S. history (from colonial period to the present), but some of the readings address contexts outside of the United States, as well as interdisciplinary and/or theoretical approaches to questions of gender/sexuality.

The Constitution of the Family & Individual Liberty, 1867-1937
Professor Rebecca A. Rix, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course explores shifts in the basis of American equality and liberty from sovereign family and corporate franchises, to individual citizenship. Interdisciplinary readings address: household government and corporate society in the nineteenth-century polity; Reconstruction's disruption of this social order and political economy; and its reconstitution by intellectuals, social networks, and constitutional amendments and laws for and against woman suffrage, labor regulation, the social welfare state, public health and education, the income tax, and Prohibition.

Approaches and Paradigms in the Study of Women and Gender in the Middle East and North Africa
Satyel K. Larson , M W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm

This course provides a broad-ranging survey of the study of women and gender in the Middle East and North Africa. Its aim is two-fold: to introduce beginners to the main concepts and themes of scholarly research in the humanities and social sciences during the last century, focusing on women and gender in regions where there are significant Muslim communities; and, to examine how human beings in a variety of historical and cultural contexts in the Middle East and North Africa experience or have experienced gender - what it means to be or become a man or a woman, and the power relations that inhere in gender as a social institution.

Approaches and Paradigms in the Study of Women and Gender in the Middle East and North Africa
Satyel K. Larson , M W 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm

This course provides a broad-ranging survey of the study of women and gender in the Middle East and North Africa. Its aim is two-fold: to introduce beginners to the main concepts and themes of scholarly research in the humanities and social sciences during the last century, focusing on women and gender in regions where there are significant Muslim communities; and, to examine how human beings in a variety of historical and cultural contexts in the Middle East and North Africa experience or have experienced gender - what it means to be or become a man or a woman, and the power relations that inhere in gender as a social institution.

Youth and Youth Movements in the Modern Middle East
Professor Sara D. Pursley , T Th 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM

The course will examine the experiences of young people as a lens onto the texture of everyday life in the Middle East, including during the historical upheavals of decolonization, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the 1979 Iranian revolution, the Lebanese Civil War, and the Arab Spring. We will also look at a variety of oppositional youth movements over the past century; political and cultural, secular and Islamic, reformist and revolutionary; to explore questions around generational ruptures and affinities, as well as how these might relate to other affiliations such as those of nation, class, and gender.

Bioethics, Sex and Society in Muslim Communities
Professor Satyel K. Larson, T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

There is growing interest today in bioethics and how human beings form ethical subjectivities during embodied life-crisis events such as pregnancy, birth, illness and death. This course examines how various Muslim communities use their cultural and textual heritages to respond to the challenges of new technologies and biomedicine in questions related to the beginnings of life. We will consider how Muslims cultivate ethical subjectivities in increasingly global localities, and the gender politics of reproduction and fertility.

Interest Groups and Social Movements in American Politics and Policy
Professor Dara Z. Strolovitch , T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

This course engages theoretical and empirical work about interest groups and social movements in American politics and policy-making. We examine theories of interest group and social movement formation, maintenance and decline; how interest groups and social movements attempt to influence public policy; the impact of interest groups and social movements; lobbying; the relationships between interest groups and the three branches of the federal government; interest groups, elections, campaign finance, PACs, and 527s; and the effectiveness of interest groups and social movements as agents of democratic representation.

Psychology of Gender
Professor Keiko T. Brynildsen , M W 11:00 am - 11:50 am

Gender is a topic with which everybody feels intimately familiar. Indeed, people hold strong beliefs about how women and men are similar to and different from each other and about why gender differences exist. This course holds those beliefs up to scientific scrutiny, examining major theories and empirical findings in psychological research on gender. Topics include empirical comparisons of men and women, gender stereotypes and their perpetuation, and the role of gender and gendered beliefs in interpersonal relationships and physical and psychological well-being.

The Buddhist Individual
Professor Eric R. Huntington , Th 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

How does a tradition portray an individual, and how does an individual see themselves within a tradition? From epics of kings to private visionary experiences, the relationship of the individual to the tradition is a central theme of Buddhism. This course examines different conceptions of the individual by looking at numerous examples, including devoted patrons, accomplished masters, and struggling practitioners. Major themes include the structure of early Buddhist society, the roles of women, and autobiography. Topics will be drawn from 2,000 years of literature and artwork from India and Tibet.

Women and Gender in Islamic Societies
Professor Shaun E. Marmon , T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Topics include: Women and the Law; Women and Sexuality; Gender and Seclusion; Women and Modernity; Gender and Post-Colonial Societies; Women's Voices; Women and Film; Politics of Women's Bodies; Women and Modern Islamic Revivalism. No prior background in Islam or Gender Studies required. Readings from fields of history, religious studies, anthropology, sociology and politics. Weekly primary sources in translation include: religious texts, popular literature, court records, letters, novels, poetry, autobiography, newspapers and films with subtitles.

Topics in Economic and Organizational Sociology (Half-Term) - Institutions, Class, and Social Capital
Professor Alejandro Portes , Th 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

This six-week course explores selected themes in the field of economic sociology, beginning with classic contributions to its basic theoretical framework and the macro-assumptions that underline the field, and continuing with a review of key explanatory concepts applicable in a variety of contexts and to the analysis of a number of economic topics. Finally, we will examine some "strategic sites" for the application of the sociological lens to economic topics.

Playing Against Type
Brian E. Herrera , W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This workshop course for actors, directors and scholars rehearses how to play with and against "type" in performance. The course uses scene- and monologue-study to press upon the limits of the conventions of typecasting. Course participants will experiment with cross-gender and cross-cultural casting; mask improvisation; conceptual casting; and performing across age, size, and ability. Throughout, the course engages relevant scholarly literature assessing the transformational act of taking on a role and uses in-class exercises, presentations and performances to press theory into practice (and vice versa).

Friendship
Professor Heather K. Love, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course offers an introduction to the history and philosophy of friendship. We will consider friendship in relation to eros and same-sex desire; as a recurrent trope in literary history; as a mode of political thought; and in relation to questions of representation and truth. We will reflect at length on recent queer rethinkings of friendship as a way of life, and consider the intersection of class, race, and gender in the making of queer communities. In addition, this course will explore the classroom as a space for the rethinking of social relations.

Isn't It Romantic? The Broadway Musical from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Sondheim
Professor Stacy E. Wolf, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Song. Dance. Man. Woman. These are the basic components of the Broadway musical theatre. How have musical theatre artists, composers, lyricists, librettists, directors, choreographers, and designers worked with these building blocks to create this quintessentially American form of art and entertainment? Why are musicals structured by love and romance? This course will explore conventional and resistant performances of gender and sexuality in the Broadway musical since the 1940s. PLEASE NOTE: THE COURSE LOCATION is Room 219 in the Lewis Center at 185 Nassau St.

Contemporary Theories of Gender and Sexuality
Professor Gayle M. Salamon, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

We will take as our primary text the new translation of Simone deBeauvoir's landmark volume The Second Sex, one of the most significant origin points of current understandings of gender. In our sustained consideration of The Second Sex, we will explore Beauvoir's ideas about the influence of sex and gender on childhood, the family, sexuality, relationships, aging, work, the social order, and the philosophical imaginary. We will also consider contemporary fiction and film alongside that text, taking Beauvoir as our tour guide as we encounter and interpret contemporary representations of gender.

Born in the U.S.A.: Culture and Reproduction in Modern America
Professor Elizabeth M. Armstrong, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Reproduction is a basic biological process, as well as a fundamental one for all societies. While the biology of human reproduction is universal across time and place, cultural norms and social institutions powerfully inflect and shape the experience of pregnancy and childbirth in every society. This course investigates the history and sociology of reproduction, focusing on the contemporary United States, but with an eye toward other societies for comparison. How, why, and for whom does birth matter? How do reproductive practices reflect gender, race, and class? The course examines the culture, politics, and economics of reproduction.

Gender and Sexuality in American Politics and Policy
Professor Dara Z. Strolovitch, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines the ways in which gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by U.S. politics and public policy, emphasizing intersections with other categories, identities, and forms of marginalization including race, ethnicity, class, ideology, and partisan identification. We examine the history, approaches, and controversies in research about gender and sexuality in U.S. politics from a range of theoretical and methodological approaches. We also explore feminist, queer, and intersectional theories and methodologies, related work from other disciplines, and research that does not fit neatly into traditional disciplinary categories.

Making Gender: Bodies, Meanings, Voices
Professor Rena S. Lederman, M W 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

How do gendered and sexual identities, relationships, and meanings differ and how are they similar across cultural and historical contexts? This course illustrates the uses of fieldwork and other anthropological methods in answering questions about the universality or particularity of gendered experience. We draw on theories about human nature, cultural meaning, and linguistic and social structures, power, and agency to understand representations of maleness, femaleness, and other sexed/gendered distinctions, to explore how such representations are made and remade, and to relate them to other kinds of social difference and inequality.

Topics in Medieval Greek Literature: Abused, Repentant, Transvestite, Holy Women in Byzantium
Professor Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis , TTh 1:30 PM - 2:50 PM

In this course we will read a selection of stories about a new social and religious figure, the female saint. Translated from medieval Greek, these "Lives" of holy women from the later Roman and Byzantine world combine social realism (wives fleeing brutal husbands, girls escaping prostitution, women disguised as monks in order to gain entry into male preserves) with a Christian idealist piety. We will attempt to understand how such literature evolved and why the figure of the female saint escaping the plight of her gender resonated in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Anthropology of the Body: Theories and Practices in China & Beyond
Professor Everett Y. Zhang , Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines the rise of the notion of the body. Engaging with major theorists of the body, it explores the body as an analytical category of human existence, compared to notions of subject, agency, self and so on. Relying on ethnographies, historical studies and cultural studies in China and beyond, it introduces a balanced perspective between bodily experience and social construction of the body by various forces (religious rituals, legal regulations, scientific knowledge, political protocols, medical practices, disciplines, and popular culture), and explores different bodies and the complex relationship between the body and life.

Evolution and the Behavior of the Sexes
Staff, T Th 11:00 - 12:20 PM, W 11:00 - 11:50 AM, T 7:30 - 8:20 PM

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED. This course, designed to capitalize on diverse student backgrounds, will use principles of evolutionary biology and behavioral ecology to examine mating strategies and their effect on social systems. We will draw examples from vertebrates, with an emphasis on group-living mammals, particularly primates and elephants. Topics will include mate selection, ontogeny of sex differences, sexual diversity, social bonds and cooperation, and intersexual conflict.

Topics in German Medieval Literature - Before Gender: Cross-Dressing and Sex in Medieval Romance
Professor Sara S. Poor, T Th 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM

A young Arthurian knight loses honor because he enjoys having sex with his wife. The Grail King is wounded near fatally in the genitals while trying to win the "wrong" woman. Young kings dress up and act like women in order to woo their prospective brides. This course will explore what it meant to be men and women in love (with each other or with God) in some of the most spectacular literary works of the German Middle Ages. The larger context for our discussion will be a more nuanced understanding of the history of sexuality. Readings and discussion primarily in modern German, some readings and discussion in English.

Queer Utopias: Culture, Fantasy, and the Formation of Sexual Identities
Professor David L. Minto, M W 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

This course explores the role of culture and fantasy in the construction of lesbian, gay, transgender, and other queer individual and group identities over the C20th. What material conditions have allowed queer utopias to be conceived and by whom? In what ways have dominant cultures imposed themselves on queer fantasy lives? How has queer world-making blurred the boundary between the real and the ideal, the social and the imaginary, the personal and the political? Each week we will focus on one or more period texts­--diaries, photos, stories, songs, plays, or films­--analyzing what they evidence about queer imaginations and communities.

The History of Incarceration in the U.S.
Professor Regina Kunzel, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

The prison is a growth industry in the U.S.; it is also a central institution in U.S. political and social life, shaping our experience of race, class, gender, sexuality, citizenship, and political possibility. This course explores the history of incarceration over the course of more than two centuries. It tracks the emergence of the penitentiary in the early national period and investigates mass incarceration of the late 20th century. Topics include the relationship between the penitentiary and slavery; the prisoners' rights movement; Japanese internment; immigration detention; and the privatization and globalization of prisons.

Topics in the History of Sex and Gender - Gender and Science
Professor Erika L. Milam, T 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM

The seminar begins by exploring classic scholarship centered on four historical periods, each posited as important moments in the origin of gendered science: medieval Christianity, the scientific revolution, the professionalization of scientists in the late-19th century, and 20th-century second-wave feminism. We then turn to a series of well-developed analytical tools employed by historians of science and gender, and finally to recent scholarship. In all cases, we will analyze the imbricated processes by which science as a social enterprise has been fundamentally gendered and the implicit gendering of the sciences of sex and sexuality.

Gender, Sexuality, and Modernity in the Middle East
Professor Sara D. Pursley , T Th 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM

Muslim women's status has been a major concern in discussions of Western interventions in the Middle East, including the US invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. Within the region, gender and sexuality have played a crucial role in nationalist movements and processes of state formation. What is the relation between women's rights, "tradition," and "modernity"? Why does the theme keep arising in debates over secularism and Islam? Are sexual identities linked to imperialism? What is a traditional Islamic family? And do Muslim women really need saving? This seminar will explore scholarly debates on these and other questions across the disciplines.

Seminar in American Politics - Interest Groups, Social Movements, and the Politics of Inequality
Professor Dara Z. Strolovitch, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Examines interest groups and social movements as agents of representation and political change in U.S. politics and policy. Uses primary and secondary sources to explore a broad range of organizations and movements, emphasizing ones representing marginalized groups such as women, people of color, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, and low-income people. Considers issues including the impact of interest groups and social movements; the intersections among movements' agendas, identities, and participants; and the relationships between movements and more conventional forms of politics such as elections, parties, and institutions.

Gender and Performing Arts in South Asia
Professor Robert L. Phillips, T Th 1:30 PM - 2:50 PM

How has the nexus of gender, the performing arts, and aesthetics been theorized, constructed, and experienced at different times and in different places in South Asian societies? What roles have courtesans and courtesan cultures played in artistic and performance traditions in South Asia? In exploring these and related questions we will draw from music, dance, film, literature, and ethnographic and historical sources as we consider the complexities of social and cultural discourses in relation to the performing arts.

Gender and Development in the Americas
Professor Ana M. Goldani, M W 3:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines gender as an integral component of socio-economic development in the United States and areas of Latin America. We give attention to processes of industrial restructuring on a global scale that have increased the participation of women in the labor force and transformed men's employment alternatives. The relationship between gender inequality and social order is a central focus. We give special attention to liberal and Marxian approaches in economics.

Intro to Gender & Sexuality Studies
Gayle M. Salamon, MW 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

What does it mean to be a woman or a man? Or neither? How do gender and sexuality, those seemingly most personal and private of attributes, emerge from networks of power and social relations? This course introduces major concepts in the interdisciplinary field of gender and sexuality studies. We will analyze the ways in which gender, as an object of study and as a lived experience, intersects with class, race, and ability, and will examine the relation between gender, sexuality and power in literary, philosophical, political and medical discourses.

History and the Body
Regina Kunzel, TTH 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

This course introduces students to new scholarship on the history of the body and the shifting political and cultural contests over understandings of the "natural" or "normal" body.

Feminist Media Studies / Media Representations of Feminism
Melissa Deem, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Feminist Media Studies/Media Representations of Feminism considers discourses of feminism that are not usually put in direct conversation. Feminist studies of media are a rich and varied field of inquiry, while feminism itself is a recurring object of media fascination. In public, media stories of feminism circulate as authoritative. Feminist arguments often become public spectacles where the media simultaneously leers at and dismisses feminist speech. In the process, these spectacularly public representations of feminism reduce the multiplicity of feminist positions and voices.

Feminist and Queer Method
Heather K. Love, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course explores the paradox of producing positive knowledge in the absence of or in opposition to disciplinary dictates about what counts as knowledge. We consider queer and feminist studies alongside other anti-disciplinary formations.

Model Memoirs
Imani Perry, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Explores the life-writing of American, African, and Asian women in the fashion industry as a launching point for thinking about race, gender, and class. How do ethnicity and femininity intersect? How are authenticity and difference commodified? How do women construct identities through narrative and negotiate their relationships to their bodies, families, and nations? This course will include guest lectures by fashion editors and models; discussions of contemporary television programs, global fashion, and cultural studies; and student self-narratives about their relationships with cultural standards of beauty, whether vexed or not.

The Revolution will not be Televised
John W. Borneman, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

What is revolutionary change today? Present discontents have been attributed to heightened inequality and worker exploitation, expanded global trade and permeable national borders, increased circulation of ideas through new media, and the undermining of forms of traditional authority. Revolutionary programs (e.g., as led by Marx, Lenin, Mao) exist as social projects of political and sexual emancipation, but they tend not to be informed by theories of ritual and everyday culture. In this course we will consider these theories as we explore revolutionary impulses from the Arab Spring, Ukraine, and the 1960's Americas.

Classical Mythology
Melissa Haynes, M W 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

An introduction to the classical myths in their cultural context and in their wider application to human concerns (such as creation, sex and gender, identity, transformation, and death). The course will offer a who's who of the ancient imaginative world, study the main ancient sources of well known stories, and introduce modern approaches to analyzing myths.

Stolen Years: Youth under the Nazis
Froma I. Zeitlin, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines the gendered experiences of childhood & adolescence under the Nazis in World War II as witnessed, remembered, and represented in texts and images through a variety of genres and different nationalities. We include historical studies, diaries, testimonies, memoirs, fiction (semi-autobiographical or otherwise), photos, and film (documentary & feature) of 1st and 2d generations. While we focus on the fate of Jewish youth, who were deliberate targets of genocidal policy, not just unintended victims, we will also attend to others in the occupied countries. In final projects, students may elect to study other theaters of war.

Seminar. Types of Ideology and Literary Form - Pornography, Gender and the Rise of the Novel in Europe
April Alliston, W 7:30 PM - 10:20 PM

Open to graduate and undergraduate students interested in understanding the origins of the modern novel, this seminar examines the profound historical, theoretical and formal connections between the development of pornography as a distinct category of representation and the development of the novel as a literary genre during the Enlightenment. We will also explore the continuing resonances of those connections today. Readings in current criticism, history and theory of the novel and pornography will accompany primary readings.

The Female Literary Tradition
Deborah E. Nord, MW 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

The course will survey a range of novels by women writers from the early 19th century to the present. How is the "tradition" transformed by post-WW II globalism, the geography and politics of empire, by differences in nationality, class, religion, and sexuality?

Queer Theory
Gayle M. Salamon, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

In this course, we will read extensively in the interdisciplinary field of queer theory, from its emergence two decades ago to its present-day articulations. We will explore what is meant by "queer," what relation it may or may not have to "homosexuality" and "gay" and lesbian," and what challenges it poses to a politics of identity. We will also interrogate the category of "theory" itself--what it is, what it does, and what kinds of literary or historical interventions it can perform. Particular attention will be paid to the queering and de-queering of public space.

Gender and Sexuality in Modern America
Margot Canaday, MW 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

This course examines the history of gender and sexuality across the 20th century, with emphasis on both regulation and resistance. Topics include early homosexual subcultures; the commercialization of sex; reproduction and its limitation; sex, gender, and war; cold war sexual containment; the feminist movement; conservative backlash; AIDS politics; same-sex marriage; Hillary; and many others.

Woman in American Higher Education
Nancy W. Malkiel, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

The history of women in American higher education from the early 19th to the late 20th century, focusing on the founding and evolution of leading women's colleges; the early experience of coeducation; the formation of coordinate colleges for women; and the wave of coeducation that swept over colleges and universities beginning in 1969. We'll study the adoption of coeducation at previously single-sex institutions (e.g. Princeton, Yale, Dartmouth, Amherst, Vassar, Oxford, Cambridge) and investigate the experience of women's colleges that remained single-sex. We'll assess the results of coeducation and the continuing case for women's colleges.

Topics in the History of Sex and Gender - History of Sexuality
Regina Kunzel, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

A survey of important work in the history of sexuality, seeking to understand sexuality not only as a topic of historical inquiry but as a category of analysis. Seminar focuses on U.S. history (from colonial period to the present), but some of the readings address contexts outside of the United States, as well as interdisciplinary and/or theoretical approaches to questions of gender/sexuality.

Youth and Youth Movements in the Modern Middle East
Sara D. Pursley, TTH 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM

The 2011 Arab Spring, often framed as a "youth revolution," has fueled new interest in Middle East youth movements. Through the study of youth, we'll explore the texture of everyday life in the region during some of the core political upheavals of the past century, such as decolonization, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the 1979 Iranian Revolution, the Lebanese Civil War and the 2011 uprisings. This focus opens onto pressing questions of the modern era related to the family, gender and sexuality; religious and secular approaches to self-formation; notions of progress, change and revolution; and experiences of war, dislocation and migration.

Seminar in American Politics - Gender and American Politics
Tali Mendelberg, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines the intersection of gender and politics in the United States.

Psychology of Gender
Keiko T. Brynildsen, MW 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Gender is a topic with which everybody feels intimately familiar. Indeed, people hold strong beliefs about how women and men are similar to and different from each other and about why gender differences exist. This course holds those beliefs up to scientific scrutiny, examining major theories and empirical findings in psychological research on gender. Topics include empirical comparisons of men and women, gender stereotypes and their perpetuation, and the role of gender and gendered beliefs in interpersonal relationships and physical and psychological well-being.

Women and Gender in Islamic Societies
Shaun E. Marmon, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This seminar focuses on issues of gender and sexuality in Islamic societies, past and present. Readings are drawn from the fields of history, religious studies, anthropology and sociology. Readings also include a wide range of texts in translation, including novels and poetry. Films are an integral part of the course. Topics include: women's lives; women's writings; female piety; marriage and divorce; sexuality and the body; and women and Islamic fundamentalism.

Topics in Economic and Organizational Sociology (Half-Term) - Gender and Economic Activity
Viviana A. Zelizer, W 10:30 AM - 1:30 PM

Introduction to a gendered analysis of economic processes and institutions. Course investigates when, why, and in what ways gender shapes production, consumption, distribution, and transfer of assets. After a general discussion of gender theories, it surveys how gender works in a variety of settings and activities, such as labor markets, intimate economies, and caring labor. We end with an overview of strategies aimed at reducing gendered economic inequalities. Overall, the course attempts to strengthen intellectual bridges between economic sociology and gender scholarship.

Feminist Media Studies /Media Representations of Feminism
Professor Melissa Deem, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Feminist media studies are a rich field of inquiry, while feminism is a recurring object of media fascination. Media stories of feminism circulate as authoritative. Feminist arguments often become public spectacles where the media leers at and dismisses feminist speech. These spectacularly public representations reduce the multiplicity of feminist positions and voices.

Queer Citizenship: Merging Theory and Activism
Professor Tey Meadow, M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Is there a particularly "queer" way to be a world citizen? Does a queer perspective mitigate for certain forms of social, interpersonal or political action? Is a university education necessary, or even useful, for these endeavors? Does academic queer theory have any relevance to "real-world" LGBTQ activism? In this course, students will examine the connections and disconnects between academic work in gender and sexuality studies and the ways feminist and LGBTQ politics are imagined and lived within contemporary activist communities.

Contemporary Feminist Theory
Professor Gayle M. Salamon, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

We will take as our primary text the new translation of Simone deBeauvoir's landmark volume The Second Sex, one of the most significant origin points of current understandings of gender. In our sustained consideration of The Second Sex, we will explore Beauvoir's ideas about the influence of sex and gender on childhood, the family, sexuality, relationships, aging, work, the social order, and the philosophical imaginary. We will also consider contemporary fiction and film alongside that text, taking Beauvoir as our tour guide as we encounter and interpret contemporary representations of gender.

Born in the U.S.A.: Culture and Reproduction in Modern America
Professor Elizabeth M. Armstrong, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Reproduction is a basic biological process, as well as a fundamental one for all societies. While the biology of human reproduction is universal across time and place, cultural norms and social institutions powerfully inflect and shape the experience of pregnancy and childbirth in every society. This course investigates the history and sociology of reproduction, focusing on the contemporary United States, but with an eye toward other societies for comparison. How, why, and for whom does birth matter? How do reproductive practices reflect gender, race, and class? The course examines the culture, politics, and economics of reproduction.

Introduction to Asian American Studies: "Too Cute!" and the New Asiamania
Professor Anne Cheng, TTh 10:00 AM - 10:50 PM

What does a minute and shallow category like "cuteness" have to do with a serious subject like race? This course offers an introduction to key terms in Asian American Studies through the lens of the seemingly insatiable American appetite for "Asian cuteness." How do we reconcile this craving with the history of anti-Asian sentiments in this country? Are other races or racial styles cute? If not, why not? We will explore cuteness as commodity, globalization, aesthetics, affect, and politics. Above all, we want to understand the relationship between race and style.

Women's Leadership in Modern America
Professor Karen Y. Jackson-Weaver, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines issues related to gender, race, and class as substructures which shape the leadership of women in modern America. One of the focuses of the course will be to critique meanings of leadership particularly as we study the meaning of freedom in American society within the context of the civil rights and women's movements. Drawing upon a myriad of primary sources including speeches, autobiographical accounts, newspapers, television and film programs, we will highlight how several contemporary American historiographies situate women as activists versus leaders and the significance of this projection.

Evolution and the Behavior of the Sexes
Professor Blair R. Costelloe, TTh 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

This course, designed to capitalize on diverse student backgrounds, will use principles of evolutionary biology and behavioral ecology to examine mating strategies and their effect on social systems. We will draw examples from vertebrates, with an emphasis on group-living mammals, particularly primates and elephants. Topics will include mate selection, ontogeny of sex differences, sexual diversity, social bonds and cooperation, and intersexual conflict.

Austen, Bronte, Eliot: Abandoning the Marriage Plot
Professor Deborah E. Nord, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course will consider the demands, opportunities, and constraints of the marriage plot in nineteenth-century fiction. We will read early and late novels by Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, and George Eliot with an eye to the evolution of the plot of courtship and marriage in the literary careers of each. How does each novelist deploy and yet rebel against literary and sexual convention? What kinds of experiments and departures from tradition does each novelist attempt in her later works and especially in what turns out to be her final novel?

Gender and Sexuality in Modern America
Professor Margot Canaday, TTh 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

This course examines the history of gender and sexuality across the 20th century, with emphasis on both regulation and resistance. Topics include early homosexual subcultures; the commercialization of sex; reproduction and its limitation; sex, gender, and war; cold war sexual containment; the feminist movement; conservative backlash; AIDS politics; same-sex marriage; Hillary; and many others.

The Constitution of the Family & Individual Liberty, 1867-1937
Professor Rebecca A. Rix, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course explores shifts in the basis of American equality and liberty from sovereign family and corporate franchises, to individual citizenship. Interdisciplinary readings address: household government and corporate society in the nineteenth-century polity; Reconstruction's disruption of this social order and political economy; and its reconstitution by intellectuals, social networks, and constitutional amendments and laws for and against woman suffrage, labor regulation, the social welfare state, public health and education, the income tax, and Prohibition.

Seminar in American Politics - Gender and American Politics
Professor Tali Mendelberg, T 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This course examines the intersection of gender and politics in the United States.

Early Christian Women: From Mary Magdalene to Martyred Mothers
Professor AnneMarie Luijendijk, TTh 1:30 PM - 2:50 PM

In this course we explore early Christian women as preachers, prophets, martyrs, mothers, and virgins. You will develop sophisticated reading skills by studying and interpreting a wide variety of early Christian texts and evidence from the material world (frescoes, papyrus letters). We meet, among others, Chloe, Jesus' mother Mary, Mary Magdalene, Thecla, and Perpetua and Felicitas. Questions we will investigate are: How did male Christian authors view the position of women in their communities? What can we extract historically about women? How do ancient debates relate to contemporary issues on gender and religion?

Women and Gender in Islamic Societies
Professor Shaun E. Marmon, Th 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

This seminar focuses on issues of gender and sexuality in Islamic societies, past and present. Readings are drawn from the fields of history, religious studies, anthropology and sociology. Readings also include a wide range of texts in translation, including novels and poetry. Films are an integral part of the course. Topics include: women's lives; women's writings; female piety; marriage and divorce; sexuality and the body; and women and Islamic fundamentalism.

Sex in Ancient Judaism and Christianity
Professor Moulie Vidas, W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Contemporary discussions about sexuality are filled with Jewish and Christian texts from antiquity. Quotations from the Bible and its ancient interpretations are continuously used to make claims about sexual behavior and sexual desire. Yet these texts themselves come from a very different world, with values, facts and passions of its own. This course examines the classical Jewish and Christian texts on sexuality within their own ancient historical context. Throughout the course, we will emphasize the diversity of positions in antiquity and the broad cultural conversations in which these positions were staked.

Gender and Development in the Americas
Professor Ana M. Goldani, MW 7:30 PM - 8:50 PM

This course examines gender as an integral component of socio-economic development in the United States and areas of Latin America. We give attention to processes of industrial restructuring on a global scale that have increased the participation of women in the labor force and transformed men's employment alternatives. The relationship between gender inequality and social order is a central focus. We give special attention to liberal and Marxian approaches in economics.

Perilous Desires: Witches, Saints, and Sinners
Professor Larissa Brewer-García, MW 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

This course focuses on representations of women's bodies and sexualities in early Latin American writings. In doing so, we will study the body through a variety of lenses: the anatomical body as a site of construction of sexual difference, the witch's body as a site of sexual excess, the mystic's body as a double of the possessed body, the tortured body as a site of knowledge production, and the racialized bodies of New World women as sites to govern sexuality, spirituality, labor, and property in the reaches of the Spanish Empire.